Suitable

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Suitable

Describing a strategy or trading philosophy in which the investor is operating in accordance with his(her) financial means and investment objectives.

Suitability

The legal requirement than an investment adviser, broker, or other party act in a way most likely to fit a client's investment goals. See also: Fiduciary responsibility.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those results indicate the suitableness of use of optimized color combinations even in case of blood vessel detection methods developed for use with green channel only.
Tis very probable that that wonderful suitableness of green for the grass and plants, the blue of the sky, the white of the clouds, the colors of flowers, consists in a complicated proportion that these colors make one with another, either in the magnitude of the rays, the number of vibrations that are caused in the optic nerve, or some other way.
Although he wavered for a time still, a sermon on the text, "Jesus, thou Son of David, have mercy on me," gripped him and "opened the way of salvation, the suitableness, fullness, and willingness of God.
Also relevant, given the lack of other drug use measures that are significant, is that apparently it is not just being a drug user that increases one's suitableness as a target, but where one uses drugs.
Why would one think that we need an inference to the suitableness of considering something non-existent when one is already directly aware, through anupalabdhi, that it doesn't exist?
Though he may not have the last word on the subject, Emerson contends that they retain no functional meaning: "That form out of which the life and suitableness have departed, should be as worthless in [faith's] eyes as the dead leaves that are falling around us" (Essays 1139).
Scott (1937, 317) was confident that Smith wrote the manuscript known as the Early Draft of The Wealth of Nations specifically to remind Townshend of his suitableness as tutor to the young duke of Buccleuch.
Commonly associated with the phrases, "ancient constitution" and "propriety," this outlook placed much stock in "long-standing ways of doing things, justified either by the sheer antiquity of practice or by the wisdom and suitableness that antiquity signifies" (p.