suitor

(redirected from suit)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Suitor

A company that makes an offer to buy another company. The term has a positive connotation and may therefore refer especially to a friendly takeover attempt. See also: White Knight, Acquiring firm.

suitor

A company that offers to purchase another firm.
References in classic literature ?
My freedom suit is ordered, and you may see me playing tag with Rose and the boys before long," answered Mrs.
Rose spoke gently but decidedly, though there was a look of regret when her eye fell on the other suit which Phebe had brought in; and it was very natural to like to look as other girls did.
These two suits of flannel, each in one piece from head to foot, with a skirt or so hung on this easily-fitting waist, will keep the child warm without burdening her with belts, and gathers, and buckles, and bunches round the waist, and leave free the muscles that need plenty of room to work in.
I don't ask that, Rose, but I wish you'd weigh and compare the two suits, and then choose which seems best.
Certainly, none of the Emperor's various suits, had ever made so great an impression, as these invisible ones.
The suit destined to grace his approaching nuptials being now selected, he replaced the others with no less care than he had displayed in drawing them from the musty nooks where they had silently reposed for many years.
As any New York real estate professional would understand, the property would greatly increase in value if it became unencumbered by the Time Warner lease," the Hadar suit states.
The suit challenged UCLA's business plan, which expanded the school's historical role as a research and teaching institution by acquiring community hospitals and clinics and forcing staff members to become part of the university medical group.
While Marks & Spencer's tweed effect trouser suit can look great worn with trainers and a hooded fleece.
Keep your cool in a crisp linen-blend suit (below).
If this principle is acceptable, it would be wise to establish in advance that an avid litigant can pay such penalties and thus that a reasonable amount of money be put in escrow before any suit can begin, simply because we an know that collecting debts from moneyed dead, beats, such as negligent absentee fathers, is as much a social problem today as street thuggery (and morally similar in its arrogant contempt for the law).
Case law has varied widely on the excludability of personal injury claim awards, depending on the basis for the suit or settlement agreement.