substitute

(redirected from substitutive)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

Substitute

A good or service that satisfies a consumer's needs or desires just as well or almost as well as a similar good or service. A common type of substitute is an off-brand product; for example, a grocery store may sell its own peanut butter to compete with the on-brand peanut butter it also sells. Often, though not always, the price of a substitute is lower than that of the original product, but they follow generally the same trends. For example, if demand for the on-brand peanut butter rises, its price increases, but so does the price of the off-brand peanut butter, because consumers are willing to pay more for peanut butter generally, but are still looking for a bargain.

substitute

See swap.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Company will dispatch separate announcement after the abovementioned Substitutive Power Agreement is entered into.
In other words, the outcome does not leave any of the stimulus~~~response events unchanged; and hence, the assumption of a particular directionality to the substitutive process cannot be sustained.
This variety of substitutive materialism has the same pernicious quality of other varieties because it is unquenchable; we can't ever replace what is no longer missing or fill a hole that only exists in the past.
A substitutive nature of interplay implies a dysfunctional interaction between relational governance and formal control either via what we term cannibalization or via what we term destruction.
The first model she looks at, which she describes as "the most prominent model of gay civil rights," (185) is the substitutive model.
5 mIU/L), and we also found that substitutive treatment, when started within the first trimester, is able to reduce the rate of complications.
Nevertheless, such a conclusion needs to be empirically tested, especially considering the alleged substitutive role of FDI and financial development.
The fear that formal services might be reducing informal care was bolstered by research supporting a substitutive relationship between formal and informal care, which points to the exchangeability of the two forms of care (Greene 1983; Pezzin, Kemper, and Reschovsky 1996; Van Houtven and Norton 2004; Rogero-Garcia, Prieto-floreis, and Rosenberg 2008).
Here, he shows how representations of the tribade require a substitutive logic that at once reasserts the need for the dominant male partner and imagines forms of erotic relation that dispense with sexual difference.
The first is to identify jurisdictions that offer investment opportunities in their territory that are comparable or substitutive (at least to a certain degree) with investments offered in U.
By conceiving of the gothic in this way, she argues, one can also understand "the highly repetitive quality of the gothic," what she calls its "riffs": gothic cultural modes are "almost ritualistic in the ways they have increasingly served as substitutive public religious practices" (6, 10).
Here, lifelikeness follows the substitutive logic of graffiti tags, online avatars, and other such pictures that stand for an absent so-and-so.