substitute

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Substitute

A good or service that satisfies a consumer's needs or desires just as well or almost as well as a similar good or service. A common type of substitute is an off-brand product; for example, a grocery store may sell its own peanut butter to compete with the on-brand peanut butter it also sells. Often, though not always, the price of a substitute is lower than that of the original product, but they follow generally the same trends. For example, if demand for the on-brand peanut butter rises, its price increases, but so does the price of the off-brand peanut butter, because consumers are willing to pay more for peanut butter generally, but are still looking for a bargain.

substitute

See swap.
References in periodicals archive ?
on the complementary and substitutive effects as well as cost and
The symmetrical substitutive relation is likely in the respondent example as well.
Substitutive materialism is the most complicated sort because of the variety of objectives for which material things can be a substitute.
A substitutive nature of interplay implies a dysfunctional interaction between relational governance and formal control either via what we term cannibalization or via what we term destruction.
Compared to previous studies, our finding is in line with Cassiman and Veugelers (2002) but in contrast to Love and Roper (1999, 2001), where the substitutive effect is obtained.
74) this argument reflects the substitutive approach to Gideon and can
The substitutive model, which appears to be widely used in the discussions about LGBT sexual identities and legal rights in Western countries, also frames the discussion about LGBT human rights cases in the international context in a particularized manner, where open expression of identity becomes essential for the progress of international LGBT rights.
When viewed in combination with plots of this interaction effect, our results seem to suggest that the two forms of embeddedness have a substitutive effect on the cost of resources.
This is akin to the substitutive model posited by Greene (1983), which implies an inverse relationship between formal and informal care--that is, the increase in use of one form of care results in a decrease in use of the other form of care.
Here, he shows how representations of the tribade require a substitutive logic that at once reasserts the need for the dominant male partner and imagines forms of erotic relation that dispense with sexual difference.
By conceiving of the gothic in this way, she argues, one can also understand "the highly repetitive quality of the gothic," what she calls its "riffs": gothic cultural modes are "almost ritualistic in the ways they have increasingly served as substitutive public religious practices" (6, 10).
Here, lifelikeness follows the substitutive logic of graffiti tags, online avatars, and other such pictures that stand for an absent so-and-so.