Suborn

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Suborn

To encourage perjury through bribery, coercion, or any other means. Like perjury itself, subornation is illegal in practically every jurisdiction.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the amount they were offering me per programme was a fortune in relation to my State pension and keeping the air in my tyres, so I was sort of suborned.
Although I would staunchly defend the equal validity of applied anthropology and its potential to produce leading edge research, it remains that, immersed in interdisciplinary contexts, it is sometimes difficult for practitioners to avoid being suborned into producing the kind of atheoretical writing that one might describe as 'UN-speak' or 'policy report language', and there is some small evidence of this here.
This was a time of political conviction and patriotism, although some agents in place were suborned by money or blackmail.
As he passed sentence he told him: "You were the instigator of this appalling crime and you suborned your sons into doing what they did.
Has the bad old world of nation-stares been subsumed, perhaps suborned, into a world order of global markets that make our attention to national hegemonies--both their interests and injustices--somehow irrelevant?
It is much more difficult to detect suborned perjury and the suppression of exculpatory evidence because they are not in the legal record.
The closed financial elite of two thousand "kings of the republic" who ran the Bank of France, which had a budget larger than that of the state, suborned deputies to do their bidding.
These questions are suborned to those about health, "which appears in none of our titles but is -- either explicitly or implicitly -- the subject of every chapter that follows and the raison d'etre for the entire work.
Bush was unable to put through the North American Free Trade Agreement, he was removed in favor of President Clinton, who promptly suborned enough Democrats in Congress to join with most of the Republicans in putting it through.
Weinstein provides valuable comments on legal processes, problems of suborned witnesses, court notaries doctoring witnesses' evidence (and challenged by fei sty women witnesses), on the role of "gossip" and "opinion" in testimony, on the problems of official peace-making and establishing sureties.
APPARENTLY there have been some complaints about last Saturday's column in which I described how I'd been suborned by the big bookmakers and `turned' to serve their cause.