Subject

(redirected from subjective)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Subject

Refers to a bid or offer that cannot be executed without confirmation from the customer. In other words, not firm, but a bid/offer that needs additional information/confirmation before becoming firm and is therefore still negotiable.

Subject

Describing a bid or offer for a security that is still negotiable. That is, a subject bid/offer is not firm and requires confirmation before a transaction involving it can be executed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Individuals may be classified as high objective-high subjective, high objective-low subjective, low objective-high subjective, or low objective-low subjective.
They also discovered that similar subjective feelings resulted in a similar pattern of activity in the OFC, suggesting the brain contains an emotion code common across distinct experiences of pleasure.
As a part of the research, participants were presented with a varied series of pictures and tastes during functional neuroimaging, then an analysis of the participants' subjective rating of their experiences, along with their brain activation patterns was done.
Amariglio emphasized that many subjective memory changes should not be cause for concern.
Our study provides compelling evidence that optimism is a universal phenomenon, that optimism is associated with improved perceptions of physical health and improved subjective well-being worldwide," said Matthew Gallagher.
Then, by assuming that all executives within the same cluster receive the same total compensation, we are able to calculate the implied subjective value each employee places on their options as compared to the average compensation in their employment cluster, a notion described in detail later.
Advertising agencies say that the irritating hike in the volume is unintentional and due to the subjective loudness meter of the audience.
Objective moral assessment is explanatorily prior to subjective moral assessment.
The Institute of Subjective Well-Being creates awareness about established and pioneering research in the field of subjective well-being.
Moyar sees Williams as adopting RIC by claiming that there can be no reason justifying an action that bears no relation to 'the agent's subjective motivational set' (47).
This question is all the more fascinating because the idea of defining probability as a measure of subjective belief is not new.
However, the one place that reality is not possibility is when ideality is instantiated in our own actuality, our ethical actuality; this is subjective truth.