subagency

(redirected from subagents)
Also found in: Dictionary.

subagency

An agent who operates under the authority of another agent. Typically, the listing broker has the direct agency relationship with the seller of real property. Other real estate brokers may attempt to sell the same property and act as a subagent for the seller rather than acting as the agent for the buyer.

References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Vehicle & Vessel License Subagent Business Proposal
122) At the very least, early courts held that the specialist was a subagent of the customer's broker, who was, in turn, an agent of the public customer.
Yeole is just one of Western Union's 1,000-odd subagents in rural India; and Pasarani just one amongst the several villages Western Union has made inroads into.
22) This authority includes the power to appoint other agents or subagents when such appointment is "reasonably require[d]" (23) or "it is impracticable for the agent to perform [the task] in person.
Travel consolidator selling airline tickets to subagents, travel agents, & consumers.
32) Yet they could act also as subagents of imperialism--pushing for imperial action to serve their own interests--and as skillful manipulators of the power of precedent within the colonial system to advance their own rights.
A MINERVA agent consists of several specialised, possibly concurrent, subagents performing various tasks, whose behaviour is specified in KABUL, while reading and manipulating a common knowledge base specified in MDLP.
His stomach brewed ulcers as he set up branch offices with agents and subagents, displayed a showy lifestyle, played benefactor, gained control of a bank, reassured his ever-loyal wife Rose, and blustered his way through questioning by journalists and law enforcement personnel.
Works such as Marvin Minsky's The Society of Mind (1986) argue that the individual human being is a "society" of subagents and faculties that is largely hierarchical.
Celebrity authors like Ivana Trump and Joan Collins, astronomical advances, agents, scouts, and subagents, for whom literature is a lifestyle rather than a vocation, all earn her very pointed scorn.