subagency


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subagency

An agent who operates under the authority of another agent. Typically, the listing broker has the direct agency relationship with the seller of real property. Other real estate brokers may attempt to sell the same property and act as a subagent for the seller rather than acting as the agent for the buyer.

References in periodicals archive ?
Commerce Department subagency responsible for implementing the federal Endangered Species Act, there are currently at least four species of sea turtles that now face possible extinction: the loggerhead, the green leatherback, the hawksbill and the Kemp's ridley.
Agency and subagency ruled mightily in the post-World War II real estate brokerage industry.
When third parties were involved, subagency appeared as a natural and logical extension of the agency relationship.
Rothwell concluded by noting that Sandoz's position seems to be consistent with the views of the NIH subagency -- the John E.
In NBWA president Ron Sarasin's words, all of this added up to "a self-serving free breakfast giveaway to promote subagency lobbying," and very possibly a violation of a law that prohibits "the spending of appropriated funds to influence a member of the U.
The DRMS is a subagency of the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) and Department of Defense (DOD).
During the late 1800s, 50 years before the Federal Reserve was founded, national banks that were either closed forcibly or were voluntarily shuttering their operations went through an administrative receivership process managed by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, a subagency of the U.
In 1875, the subagency was eliminated, some of the Native Americans moving north to the Siletz Reservation, others staying in the Yachats area or scattering.
1) NAR's multiple listing policy shall be modified to delete the mandatory offer of subagency and make offers of subagency optional.
Wietor expressed doubt about sellers picking up liability for subagency in transactions where the facilitator concept is used.
The NAR, which must be aware of the lurking danger of millions of rescindable contracts, persists in mandating subagency because that is the only way it can hang onto its mainstay--the MLSs.