strike

(redirected from strikingly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Strike

The collective action in which employees do not come to work as a form of protest. That is, in a strike, workers deprive employers of their services. Often, though not always, strikers also stand outside their workplace to stage protests. A strike occurs when employees wish to force the employer to pay them better wages or benefits or to improve working conditions. Strikes are usually orchestrated by a union.

strike

a stoppage of work by a group of workers as part of an INDUSTRIAL DISPUTE with the aim of bringing pressure to bear on the employer. In the UK most strikes arise out of disputes over pay and conditions of employment. In the UK strike activity is normally measured in three ways: the number of stoppages, the number of workers involved, and the number of working days lost per 1000 employees. Of these the best indicator of ‘strike proneness’ (i.e. how likely workers are to take industrial action) is the number of working days lost per 1000 employees, because it captures more of the intensity and extent of stoppages than the other indices.

Strikes are generally both a protest and an attempt to secure concessions from employers. Their effectiveness is premised on the costs of a loss of output and the damage of relationships with suppliers, customers and employees that a stoppage of work can result in. However, strikes are costly to employees too since they usually suffer a loss of earnings for the duration of the stoppage. Employees therefore often take alternative forms of INDUSTRIAL ACTION, such as overtime bans, which are considerably cheaper. The conduct of strikes by unions is regulated by LABOUR LAW in the UK. A postal ballot of employees must be held, and employers must be given advance notice of the strike, for the strike to be lawful (and hence TRADE UNION IMMUNITIES to be retained). SECONDARY ACTION is unlawful.

strike

a stoppage of work by a group of employees as part of an INDUSTRIAL DISPUTE, with the aim of bringing pressure to bear on their employer. Strikes may be ‘official’ or ‘unofficial’, the former being backed by the employees’ TRADE UNION. Strikes often are a last resort tactic when negotiated attempts (see INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS) to agree pay levels and working conditions and where other forms of INDUSTRIAL ACTION (for example, overtime bans, ‘go-slows’, ‘work-to-rules’) fail to achieve the desired results. See EMPLOYMENT

ACTS 1980,1982,1988 and 1990, TRADE UNION ACT 1984, TRADE UNION REFORM AND EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS ACT 1993. See LOCKOUT, PICKET.

References in classic literature ?
Lydgate, in fact, was already conscious of being fascinated by a woman strikingly different from Miss Brooke: he did not in the least suppose that he had lost his balance and fallen in love, but he had said of that particular woman, "She is grace itself; she is perfectly lovely and accomplished.
They were to all appearances strikingly similar in aspect to the Negro of Africa.
He was a small man to begin with; and upon his meagre frame was deposited an even more strikingly meagre head.
It was a strikingly beautiful figure, in the strictest sense of the word.
A carbine, strikingly foreshortened, lay across the pommel of the saddle, kept in place by the right hand grasping it at the "grip"; the left hand, holding the bridle rein, was invisible.
His eyes, their blackness strikingly intensified by the pallor of his face, were fixed upon the watch, which he clutched in both hands.
Ernest's prophecy was strikingly fulfilled in the cases of Mr.
The man we have thought Dick Moore-- whom everybody in Four Winds has believed for twelve years to be Dick Moore--is his cousin, George Moore, of Nova Scotia, who, it seems, always resembled him very strikingly.
Amongst mammals, we see it strikingly displayed in Bats, and in a lesser degree in the Felidae and Canidae.
The connection between the transportal of boulders and the presence of ice in some form, is strikingly shown by their geographical distribution over the earth.
The picture was strikingly beautiful; it was the very scene itself, transferred as if by magic to the canvas; but I expressed my approbation in guarded terms, and few words, for fear of displeasing her.
He looked at her hair done up high, with the long white veil and white flowers and the high, stand-up, scalloped collar, that in such a maidenly fashion hid her long neck at the sides and only showed it in front, her strikingly slender figure, and it seemed to him that she looked better than ever--not because these flowers, this veil, this gown from Paris added anything to her beauty; but because, in spite of the elaborate sumptuousness of her attire, the expression of her sweet face, of her eyes, of her lips was still her own characteristic expression of guileless truthfulness.