Straight

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Related to straightly: strictly, strictly speaking

Straight

Direct telephone line, compared to an outside line that requires a telephone number to be dialed.

Straight

Describing a phone that connects directly to one and only one other phone. One need not dial any number between straight phones.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using the parameters of the Chery A3 car as the system parameters of vehicle, we respectively simulate and analyse the regenerative braking performances with or without ABS control on three conditions of driving straightly on high adhesion condition ground, low adhesion condition ground and steering driving on a curve path.
The main finding is that the accuracy of an approximation is not straightly dependent on its order in all cases, as holds in the case of input-output time delay.
HEC representative Rahim Bakhsh Channa straightly told Kishwar Kumar that he was telling more lies to conceal earlier lies.
It straightly indicates the decrease of CDK4 occurred in BT-483 could be interpreted as a consequence of the cyclin D3 loss but not the cyclin Dl.
When we see straightly and hard we see with the eyes of death.
It seems unlikely to me that a linear chain model can replace such object-attuned studies in complexity, because the most complex natural object on this earth itself seems unfit for structural explanations of a straightly causal kind.
We are actually dealing with burials in opposite directions but the deceased have been placed in the graves in a similar way: both upper bodies have been laid straightly, only their legs have been flexed from knees towards right.
As for] this second part on which the second contact obtains, if it connects with the first [previous] locus of contact, whether at an angle or not at an angle, then the sphere [in either case] becomes straightly extended, but this is impossible [if it is a real sphere].
In "The Restive Brute: The Symbolic Presentation of Repression and Sublimation in Kate Chopin's 'Fedora,'" the primary piece of criticism on the story to date, Joyce Dyer suggests that such outbursts will be the extent of Fedora's expression of her sexuality: "[Fedora] may try to caress the clothing of Young Malthers (or of other men) and to press desperate kisses on the mouths of unacceptable surrogates, but in public she will forever stare straightly ahead--'unruffled.
The races were examples for the use of ceques and we realize that their courses were followed as straightly as possible.