Stop

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Stop

1. An order to a broker to buy or sell a security at the best available price once a certain, stated price is reached. Suppose that price is $50. A stop order remains inactive until that security begins trading at $50, at which point the broker may fill the order at best price he/she is able to find. See also: Stop-limit order, Stop-loss order.

2. An order by the SEC to stop a new issue from taking place because of an omission or inaccuracy on its filing statement. See also: Deficiency letter.
References in periodicals archive ?
The specially-branded sofa has already stopped off on a Mersey ferry and at St John's Beacon.
We stopped off at (Wendy's) and Salma wasn't happy with the way the girls left the restaurant, so she made them get off the bus and go back and clean it up,'' Paolo said.
A council spokesperson said: ``It just shows what a profile the Mathew Street Festival now has that the QE2 stopped off.
She had been on holiday in New Zealand and stopped off in Singapore on the way home, where she believes she contracted the killer bug.
Instead, they boarded the 9am sailing to Dublin and stopped off on their way to County Cork at the Curragh, where the runaway National winner was paraded after the second race.
ALL creatures great and small turned out to meet The Queen as she stopped off in Mid Wales yesterday.
He stopped off at the American-British Academy in the country's capital city of Muscat before visiting British troops preparing to join the war against terrorism.
A man was stalked and mugged when he stopped off at a Metro station on his way home.
A RENAISSANCE man proved what a fool he is when he stopped off at Kenilworth Castle as part of his 100-mile jig.
They stopped off on their latest pilgrimageat Chester.
The Queen's former ship, which is now based at the port of Leith in Edinburgh, stopped off in Cardiff for a four-day visit.
Sent when the doomed liner stopped off at Queenstown in Ireland on April 11, 1912, the card is thought to have been written by first-class passenger Richard William Smith.