Stone

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Stone

A unit of weight equivalent to 14 pounds.
References in periodicals archive ?
This difference in stoniness is reflected in their lower mean error of 0.
By comparing the process of crystal formation to the coldness of the lady and its effects on his heart, and metrically imitating nature's effects through lyric form (the repetition of freddo, the symmetrical analogies), Dante seeks to overcome his unrequited love by lyrically crystallizing his lady's stoniness into a philosopher's stone, transcending his frustrated love by giving it metaphysical transparency: he places it within the context of the divine movements of the cosmos.
Stoniness is defined as the percentage surface cover of soil with stones having diameter greater than 20 mm; study area is classified into two classes; fully protected soil (above 10% stoniness) and not fully protected soil (below 10% stoniness).
14) Petrification, in Petrarch's fluctuating world, emerges as both a positive and negative phenomenon: on the one hand, being transformed into stone or marble implies literary immortality, as in Ovid; on the other hand, stoniness can be glossed as poetic paralysis, as in Rime sparse 125: "chi verra mai che squadre / questo mio cor di smalto, / ch' almen com' io solea possa sfogarme?
Low temperatures, heat stress, soil drainage, soil texture and stoniness, soil rooting depth, soil chemical properties, soil moisture balance and slope are the eight "biophysical criteria" proposed by the European Commission, on 21 April, to improve the classification of less favoured agricultural areas.
Low temperatures, heat stress, soil drainage, soil texture and stoniness, soil rooting depth, soil chemical properties, soil moisture balance and slope are the eight 'biophysical criteria' proposed by the European Commission, on 21 April, to improve the classification of less favoured agricultural areas.
LFA criteriawas used, such as heat stress, soil water balance, drainage and stoniness, member states should be given flexibility to reflect their own handicaps, he said.
A psychological process towards eventual healing is described via physical journeys (first to the Richtersveld and then through West Africa), a focus on the stoniness of the land, on rivers (first the Orange or "Great Gariep", and later the Niger), living "above" and "below" ground (the poet as wife versus the poet as as writer).
19) Readers of the passage find different meanings of the stoniness of women here: while Kenneth Gross takes it as a chiastic relation, Joseph B.