Stone

(redirected from stones)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to stones: Precious stones, Gemstones

Stone

A unit of weight equivalent to 14 pounds.
References in classic literature ?
The gang having already got the carcass on to the truck, the party set out at a trot, followed by screams and curses, and a shower of bricks and stones from unseen enemies.
Mas'r and Tom pelted the poor drowning creature with stones.
Great guide-boards of stone, But travelers none; Cenotaphs of the towns Named on their crowns.
He drew an imaginary circle on the stones of the roof, and burnt a pinch of powder in it, which sent up a small cloud of aromatic smoke, whereat everybody fell back and began to cross themselves and get un- comfortable.
smooth as the stones on which women grind their corn.
It is formed of rough stones, selected with care, and laid in courses or circles, with much compactness, but without cement of any kind.
The first and the mildest course is, by keeping the island hovering over such a town, and the lands about it, whereby he can deprive them of the benefit of the sun and the rain, and consequently afflict the inhabitants with dearth and diseases: and if the crime deserve it, they are at the same time pelted from above with great stones, against which they have no defence but by creeping into cellars or caves, while the roofs of their houses are beaten to pieces.
A large stone had served as a wedge; flints and pebbles had been inserted around it, so as to conceal the orifice; this species of masonry had been covered with earth, and grass and weeds had grown there, moss had clung to the stones, myrtle-bushes had taken root, and the old rock seemed fixed to the earth.
The onset of troops is like the rush of a torrent which will even roll stones along in its course.
In the intervals of the stones immense trees have taken root, and their broad boughs stretching far over, and interlacing together, support a canopy almost impenetrable to the sun.
The smaller stones were transported to the shore by means of a chain formed by twenty-five or thirty peasants.
these walls - these ivy-clad arcades - These mouldering plinths - these sad and blackened shafts - These vague entablatures - this crumbling frieze - These shattered cornices - this wreck - this ruin - These stones - alas