stigma

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stigma

A negative impression of property because of real or perceived problems.The most common stigma is associated with property that has remained on the market for whatever time period is locally considered “too long.”Potential buyers usually think there must be some problem with the property that they might or might not be able to recognize and economically cure, so they avoid such properties.Another common stigma is a commercial property,usually with a restaurant tenant, that has experienced high turnover.The reason might be that the tenants had insufficient financial resources to survive until the break-even point, but the property soon acquires a stigma as a bad location for restaurants.To some extent,the stigma can become a self-fulfilling prophecy if the community fails to patronize any business at that location because of the stigma.Despite that,there are tremendous opportunities for investors who target stigmatized properties and can successfully overcome the bad reputation.

References in periodicals archive ?
Guislain's legacy and demonstrate the continuing need to educate the general public on harmful effects of social exclusion faced by many with mental illness by recognizing the important contributions of individuals and organizations that have helped to reduce the stigma associated with these illnesses.
Challenging the stigma of mental illness; lessons for therapists and advocates.
While blaming the stigmatized and lacking sympathy for them seem to go together across a myriad of studies involving many different stigmas (cf.
Given the significant problems posed by HIV/AIDS-related stigmas, the Chinese government and non-governmental organizations have joined global efforts to reduce the stigma associated with HIV.
Stigma has been identified in the literature as a prominent factor negatively affecting individuals with mental illness and their families in various cultures (Corrigan, 2005; Corrigan, & Kleinlein, 2005; Corrigan, Watson, & Miller, 2006; Tsang, Tam, Chan & Cheung, 2003a, 2003b).
The case against stigma is that it prevents people who need help from getting it.
Sociologists like Gerhard Falk are quick to distinguish between "existential" stigmas (spurred by conditions like mental illness, over which the target has little or no control) and "achieved" stigmas (perceived as earned by the subject's own actions, like criminal behaviors), At first blush, this tidy classification appears to provide a satisfying framework for deciding the ethical, moral and even legal standing of stigmas.
Not only do they have the stigma of being a drug addict," Daunic says, "but they also carry the stigma of being a queer druggie.
NAPWA has long advocated for prevention efforts targeting people who are positive, but only as part of a larger suite of work and combined with efforts to reduce the stigma that drives many into the HIV closet.
Unfortunately, such public health messages may also exacerbate stigma by reinforcing notions of individual difference and defect.
At bottom, Campbell's own experiences with the stigma surrounding mental illness were the driving force.
It takes around 4,000 hand-harvested stigmas to yield 1 ounce of saffron.