stigma


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stigma

A negative impression of property because of real or perceived problems.The most common stigma is associated with property that has remained on the market for whatever time period is locally considered “too long.”Potential buyers usually think there must be some problem with the property that they might or might not be able to recognize and economically cure, so they avoid such properties.Another common stigma is a commercial property,usually with a restaurant tenant, that has experienced high turnover.The reason might be that the tenants had insufficient financial resources to survive until the break-even point, but the property soon acquires a stigma as a bad location for restaurants.To some extent,the stigma can become a self-fulfilling prophecy if the community fails to patronize any business at that location because of the stigma.Despite that,there are tremendous opportunities for investors who target stigmatized properties and can successfully overcome the bad reputation.

References in periodicals archive ?
No matter which of the many definitions of stigma selected, we all recognize immediately when stigma is directed at us, our child, or someone we care deeply about.
Surgeon General and three presidential administrations have identified the stigma associated with mental illness as a very real public health problem.
A $50,000 prize will be awarded to the individual or group receiving the award, which must be used toward further work to reduce societal stigma about mental illness.
In "Commentary: Abortion Provider Stigma and Mainstream Medicine," Carole Joffe of the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health at UCSF examines the separation between abortion provision and what is considered mainstream medicine, as well as how medical professional groups have begun to resist this marginalization.
Naomi's situation illustrates the difficulty of coping with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, the consequences of the illness on the family, and the importance of addressing stigma.
In addition, they answered questions pertaining to three dimensions of stigma-holding stigmatizing attitudes, perceiving stigma in the community and directly observing enacted stigma (i.
The 14 chapters in this volume consider the stigma of disease and disability, its causes, and overcoming it.
Responding to these findings, several scholars have explored the ways that gay Asian men manage the stigma of race in the larger gay community.
There seems to be a gap between the increasing knowledge we attain about HIV and the reduction of stigma in the society.
However, the figures also showed a majority of people in Edinburgh and the Lothians do have sympathy for people living with HIV, with 96 per cent believing more needs to be done to tackle stigma.
Even in countries with cultures more accepting of mental illness, stigma was detected, encompassing issues involving caring for children, marriage, self-harm, and holding roles of authority or civic responsibility.
The Tory MP said: "Unfortunately, nine in 10 people who have a mental health problem will experience stigma and discrimination.