government

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Government Bond

Any bond issued by an agency of the United States government. Government bonds are backed by the full faith and credit of the government and are considered risk-free. Most are negotiable, with prominent examples being Treasury securities or Ginnie Mae bonds. U.S. savings bonds, however, are not negotiable.

government

the primary decision-making body in a nation state responsible for national defence, maintaining law and order, etc. Government's economic role in the state depends upon the socio-political system the country has adopted, the two extremes being a CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMY and a PRIVATE ENTERPRISE ECONOMY. In the former case, governments play an all-embracing role, often owning most economic resources and determining what products to produce. In the latter case, where resources are held privately and markets are the main mechanism for allocating resources, governments play a more restricted role, merely influencing the general level of economic activity through DEMAND MANAGEMENT policies and redistribution of income and wealth. See MIXED ECONOMY, GOVERNMENT ( PUBLIC) EXPENDITURE.
References in classic literature ?
Others of them, a numerous body of whose citizens are creditors to the public beyond proportion of the State in the total amount of the national debt, would be strenuous for some equitable and effective provision.
IT IS sometimes asked, with an air of seeming triumph, what inducements could the States have, if disunited, to make war upon each other?
They will be more temperate and cool, and in that respect, as well as in others, will be more in capacity to act advisedly than the offending State.
Besides, it is well known that acknowledgments, explanations, and compensations are often accepted as satisfactory from a strong united nation, which would be rejected as unsatisfactory if offered by a State or confederacy of little consideration or power.
It is to be the assent and ratification of the several States, derived from the supreme authority in each State, the authority of the people themselves.
Were the people regarded in this transaction as forming one nation, the will of the majority of the whole people of the United States would bind the minority, in the same manner as the majority in each State must bind the minority; and the will of the majority must be determined either by a comparison of the individual votes, or by considering the will of the majority of the States as evidence of the will of a majority of the people of the United States.
When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies.
The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the legislature thereof, for six Years; and each Senator shall have one Vote.
the ideal state seems far away, and we find a dispassionate survey of imperfect states, the best ways of preserving them, and an analysis of the causes of their instability.
The large nation states to which we are accustomed make it difficult for us to think that the state could be constructed and modelled to express the good life.
Or a more general division into two parts may be adopted; the first (Books I - IV) containing the description of a State framed generally in accordance with Hellenic notions of religion and morality, while in the second (Books V - X) the Hellenic State is transformed into an ideal kingdom of philosophy, of which all other governments are the perversions.
Where there is still a people, there the state is not understood, but hated as the evil eye, and as sin against laws and customs.