FAS

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FAS

Abbreviation for the Incoterm Free Alongside Ship.

Free Alongside Ship

In maritime, international commerce, an agreement between a buyer (importer) and a seller (exporter) in which the seller is responsible for the transportation and risk of the good until it is within reach of the ship's crane, at which point the buyer assumes responsibility for both. That is, the seller does not bear the expense or risk of actually loading the good onto the ship. The buyer is responsible for clearing the good through customs in both the home country and the country of delivery.
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In a study of 110 patients, Malki et al found no significant difference in pain at 48 hours between patients who received a splint and those who did not.
Patients who were treated with initial sugar tongs splint did not differ from those who received a cast or a volar wrist splint with regards to age at time of injury, sex, side of injury, mechanism of injury, or the presence of an associated ulna fracture.
So rather than resorting to traditional treatments like a plaster cast or surgery she fashioned a leg splint to bend the infant's knee backwards.
Initially, patients are encouraged to wear their splints for 12-18 hours per day, but certainly at night and during performance of aggravating activities.
Additional data suggested that the self-reported time the splint was worn did not influence the results, but based on the splint compliance tracking device, subjects overestimated their use.
The 3-D digital surface capture camera produces a much closer fitting splint and means less visits to hospital for the patient in question.
Neutral positioning is maintained by the rescuer at the head until it is completely splinted on the full body splint.
Brockmeyer explained that the splint was "rubbing" and attempted to bend it away from the patient's leg to provide relief.
The Flexible Thumb Splint from United Pacific, Inc.
Earlier this year the Chronicle revealed how Wendy Dawson and Mark Patterson were forced to raise cash for a special splint to help their son cope with cerebral palsy.