zombie

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Zombie

A publicly-traded company that continues operations despite a merger or bankruptcy. Stocks in zombies are usually low in price because the companies are likely to cease operations (and the stocks will consequently become worthless). However, a few bottom feeders may be interested in a zombie if they believe that it can restructure and become profitable.

zombie

A company that remains in business even though it is technically bankrupt and almost surely headed for the graveyard.
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Spam is a multi-headed monster and single software solutions are no longer effective.
To stop spam and viruses from entering the system in the first place, and to ease the concern of keeping spam filters current, many businesses turn to remote e-mail filtering services that can pre-process e-mail before it is delivered to the company.
The law also prohibits sending spam that falsifies the source, destination or routing information, while requiring commercial e-mail senders to include their physical address.
Most solutions to spam fall into three classes: technical, economic, and legal.
Most of the laws are targeting deceptive marketing, fraudulent claims, falsified return addresses and unsubscribe links that don't work--the real underbelly of the spam business," said Michael Herrick, president of Matterform Media, a Santa Fe, N.
While governments, businesses, and consumers worldwide agree that fraudulent spam e-mails must be eradicated, their methods of solving the problem differ.
Barracuda Central collects image spam samples from its honeypot systems and from more than 40,000 customer systems throughout the world.
This is a very effective way to identify spam since all spam has some call to action that typically urges the user to visit a web site or another online resource.
Hormel Foods produces 435 cans of Spam per minute, selling more than 100 million cans to American consumers in 1997, according to the company's Web site.
SPAM has become a merchandising mark, transcending canned meat and creating a cultural phenomenon.
E-mail server manufacturers will be able to redirect their energies into productive features instead of "the war on spam.
Hagman's creation earned a first-place prize of $100 and a Spam apron.