Sovereign

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Sovereign

1. A gold coin in the United Kingdom. It has a face value of one British pound, but because it is made of gold, its actual value far exceeds one pound. Investors use sovereigns as bullion coins.

2. See: Sovereignty.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assessing the EU's stance, the Hezbollah leader saw that the decision was not sovereignly made by the Europeans.
That the individual states sovereignly existed prior to their Union stood prima facie to many; a majority of them had individually to ratify the Constitution before it took effect for any of them.
What is here called an 'aesthetic'," writes Balthasar, "is therefore characterized as something properly theological, namely, as the reception, perceived with the eyes of faith, of the self-interpreting glory of the sovereignly free love of God.
Instead of sovereignly guiding human affairs to their clearly defined and well-considered ends, reason seems to be little more than a coping mechanism or a regulative fiction driven and directed by instincts and desires it can hardly perceive, much less rule.
I hope that the house will make a final decision freely and sovereignly," Rabbani expressed hope.
Scholars and tribal leaders connect the continued sovereignly of tribes with the flourishing of tribal cultures.
The process vanes historically and geographically but in many regions it is considered a confirmation of sovereignly and legitimacy.
Whereas in a democracy, even if some obligation may arise from consent, there can be, since the citizen is sovereignly free, no obligation that preempts his sovereign freedom.
Chinese political authority has often been authored in the Westphalian sense, and land in China is sovereignly governed and defined by exclusive borders.
They offer four key themes that help us to understand mission in the Old Testament: (1) God creates--thus mission starts with the creation motif; (2) the people of God understood God as sovereignly involved both within Israel and in secular world history; (3) God is the one who directs history; and (4) the religiosity of Israel is fundamentally different from that of the world (Senior and Stuhlmueller, The Biblical Foundations for Mission, pp.
As Giorgio Agamben describes, for a regime to continue to sovereignly employ violence as it did at its origin, it must blur the distinction between constitutive violence (the violence, in the absence of law, that founds a state by overthrowing that which preceded it) and constituted violence (the violence used by an established state, under the law, to maintain itself by defending against external or internal threats).