Doctrine of sovereign immunity

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Doctrine of sovereign immunity

Principle that a nation may not be tried in another country without its consent.

Doctrine of Sovereign Immunity

A legal principle that a nation may not be tried in another nation's courts without its own consent. This is important when a foreign corporation has a legal claim against another nation's government. It must go to that nation's courts in order to seek redress.
References in periodicals archive ?
Obama, the Ninth Circuit was confronted with the commonly litigated and complex issue of whether a court can imply a waiver of sovereign immunity absent Congress's express inclusion of the term "United States" in the statutory waiver.
TO understand the Court's double sovereign immunity rule is
Ironically, the Rehnquist Court's revival of state sovereign immunity might simply have come fifteen years too soon.
The site compares Texas' sovereign immunity to laws in oppressive regimes like North Korea, Iran and Syria.
This Article will lay out the origins of the doctrine of sovereign immunity and the preservation of the doctrine in the Constitution.
The passing of a bill impacting sovereign immunity will have myriad implications but may have the most immediate impact upon Saudi Arabia.
Like most issues, the scope of a waiver of sovereign immunity differs by jurisdiction.
Rather, rejecting a jus cogens exception to sovereign immunity would be
And it has become almost the norm to violate the principles of sovereign immunity and equitable treatment of creditors, evidenced so clearly in the New York court's decision on Argentine debt.
To rigorously evaluate this fundamental claim, we created and analyzed an extensive dataset of foreign sovereign immunity decisions made by the State Department and the U.
As part of her international practice, Aragon advises foreign government regarding sovereign immunity matters and the application of federal and state employment laws to their personnel in the U.
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