Solvency Ratio

Solvency Ratio

A measure of a company's ability to service debts, expressed as a percentage. It is calculating by adding the company's post-tax net profit and depreciation, and dividing the sum by the quantity of long-term and short-term liabilities; the resulting amount is expressed as a percentage. A high solvency ratio indicates a healthy company, while a low ratio indicates the opposite. A low solvency ratio further indicates likelihood of default. Different industries have different standards as to what qualifies as an acceptable solvency ratio, but, in general, a ratio of 20% or higher is considered healthy. Potential lenders may take the solvency ratio into account when considering making further loans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its capital score, as measured by Fitch's Prism Factor-Based Capital Model (FBM), stood at 'Very Strong' at end-1H17 and its comprehensive solvency ratio under the China Risk Oriented Solvency System (C-ROSS) amounted to 359% at end-3Q17, well in excess of the 100% regulatory minimum requirement.
The proceeds from the IPO are to be used for enhancing its solvency margin and increasing the solvency ratio.
Businessmen stress that the low credit activity is a result of the low solvency ratio of companies, and, mainly a result of the political crisis
ADMIRAL reported a 4% increase in pre-tax profits for the first half of 2016 and raised its dividend by 23%, but spooked investors with a warning that market volatility after Brexit had squeezed its solvency ratio.
The solvency ratio represents an insurer's ability to meet all outstanding insurable risks.
To determine performance, each company's return on assets, profit margin, solvency ratio and price to earnings ratio are looked at and rankings are assigned accordingly.
This decision affects the solvency ratio of the company following the merger by a negative 0.
Patrimonial solvency ratio determines the proportion of the total assets that are financed by stockholders and not creditors.
The China Insurance Regulatory Commission requires insurers to maintain an adequate solvency level with a solvency ratio of not less than 100%.
Although the Solvency II regime has yet to be finalised, Moody's Investor Service has outlined its expectation that solvency ratios will ultimately exhibit a more complex volatility under Solvency II than under Solvency I, as both the available capital and the capital requirements of the solvency ratio will change with market conditions.
The bank recorded a gain of EUR113m from the buyback, which will help it raise its capital solvency ratio by 0.
It should not hurt in the long term, but the solvency ratio is a very important ratio for the DNB and the pension fund board.