COLA

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Cost-of-Living Adjustment

An increase to a wage, salary, or pension designed so that the real value remains the same. That is, a cost-of-living adjustment increases the underlying wage, salary, or pension so that it keeps pace with (but does not run ahead of) inflation. Federal pensions and Social Security include cost-of-living adjustments, though few other pensions do.

Cost-of-living adjustment (COLA).

A COLA results in a wage or benefit increase that is designed to help you keep pace with increased living costs that result from inflation.

COLAs are usually pegged to increases in the consumer price index (CPI). Federal government pensions, some state pensions, and Social Security are usually adjusted annually, but only a few private pensions provide COLAs.

COLA

(pronounced like the beverage) See cost-of-living adjustment.

References in periodicals archive ?
The report forecasts the global carbonated soft drinks market to grow at a CAGR of 2.
22, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Soft Drinks is the second most consumed drink after water, with plastic being the most used material for soft drinks packaging.
ISLAMABAD -- Medical experts has advised the people not to use soft drinks at Iftar and Sehr timings as such items are harmful for health.
and Asahi Soft Drinks each have market shares of around 10 percent, against a share of just above 2 percent for Calpis.
Led by Zumin Shi, MD, PhD, of the University of Adelaide, researchers conducted computer assisted telephone interviewing among 16,907 participants aged 16 years and older in South Australia between March 2008 and June 2010 inquiring about soft drink consumption.
Soft drinks can be found almost anywhere in the world, but nowhere are they as ubiquitous as the U.
THE SOFT DRINK CATEGORY IS ALIVE AND WELL, AND SUPERMARKETS HAVE A LEADERSHIP ROLE WITH THE CATEGORY RIGHT NOW," SAYS CHRIS DEMAIO, DIRECTOR OF LARGE STORE CHANNEL AT COCA-COLA ENTERPRISES IN ATLANTA.
Soft-drink companies are considering voluntary restrictions on the sale of carbonated soft drinks in schools.
An American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement in the January 2004 issue of Pediatrics calls on schools to stop selling soft drinks and start providing healthier alternatives such as real fruit juice and water.
schoolchildren drink at least one soda or other soft drink daily.
Across the nation, an estimated $150 million in soft drink sales is used to fund schools, McBride said.
Many students include a soft drink as part of their lunch at school.