Snowballing

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Snowballing

Used in the context of general equities. Process by which the exercise of stop orders in a declining or advancing market causes further downward or upward pressure on prices, thus triggering more stop orders and more price pressure, and so on.

Snowballing

A situation in which a price rises or falls, which triggers stop orders, resulting in increased pressure to buy or sell the security. The increased or decreased demand for the security drives the price up or down even further, and the cycle continues until a price correction occurs. Snowballing should not be confused with a snowball, which is a different concept altogether.
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Across the West Midlands in the last three years there have been 2,593 calls to police about snowballs culminating in three arrests.
And it's the most popular flavor at the Baltimore Snowball Factory, too, with chocolate coming in "a distant second," Garfield says.
In relation to 'Swedish snowballs, the Tribunal said that 'although the name is the same, the ingredients, the cooking process and the shelf lift of these snowballs are completely different'.
Before the decision was made, tax tribunal Judge Anne Scott and panel member Peter Sheppard had to munch their way through a selection of snowballs and other delicacies.
For hundreds of millions of years, giant snowballs and asteroids bombarded Earth, the Moon, and the other planets.
Lucy Storer (@LouLuBear) tweeted: "I got hit in the face by a snowball once which the thrower had intentionally placed some glass in.
The best snowballs are made with snow that's not too wet or too dry.
A RESTAURANT boss called the police after a dispute over a snowball fight - but was hauled through the courts himself instead.
Judith Palmer, of the Poetry Society, said: "We wanted to celebrate as he would have wanted, with Tunnock's Snowballs.
If an elderly person is having snowballs thrown at their house for no reason, that is totally unacceptable.
She said: "Although it is just kids having fun in the snow, for many residents and drivers it can be extremely intimidating to have snowballs pelted at you.
2 -- color) Steven Brotz, 8, heaves a snowball at Mountasia Family Fun Center during Christmas in July festivities.