Facility

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Facility

A loan extended by a bank to a business in need of operating capital. This may take several forms, from a short-term loan to a line of credit. Different banks have different facility plans for their clients who own or run businesses. See also: Debt financing.
References in periodicals archive ?
The transfer of knowledge into practice is a challenge in health care (Aylward, Stolee, Keat, & Johncox, 2003; Berwick, 2003), and the skilled nursing facility environment is no exception.
While it is common for skilled nursing facilities to use an experienced healthcare attorney to assist with drafting agreements to address most of these issues, it becomes challenging for a skilled nursing facility operator to determine FMV.
North Carolina: Wilkes Regional Medical Center Skilled Nursing Unit (North Wilkesboro); White Oak Manor-Rutherfordton (Rutherfordton); Annie Penn Memorial Hospital Skilled Nursing Facility (Reidsville); Wesley Pines Retirement Community (Lumberton)
All results were statistically processed and reported on a quarterly basis and are included in NeighborCare's Best Practices Recommendations to its skilled nursing facility customers and the attending physicians.
The skilled nursing facility, which has experienced delays and cost overruns, is scheduled to be completed by the end of June or early July and will begin accepting patients three to four months after that, Andrews said.
As an owner or operator of nursing homes, it's to your advantage to know how lenders identify and calculate risk when evaluating a skilled nursing facility (SNF).
The project envisioned by developers is a vast senior complex at Los Angeles Avenue and Emory Street on a 6-acre property where the company has operated a skilled nursing facility since 1997.
Daughters of Israel, a skilled nursing facility in West Orange, New Jersey, today announced that it has contracted with Evercare, a leading provider of health plans for the frail elderly, chronically ill and disabled, to offer its residents health plans designed to meet the unique needs of individuals living in a skilled nursing facility.
This program--also known as the Lombardi Program or the "Nursing Home without Walls"--enables chronically ill New Yorkers who are medically eligible for admission to a skilled nursing facility to receive long term care at home.
This means that it negotiates with a managed care organization on behalf of one of its 61 subacute or skilled nursing facility members on a contract which the organization is then free to accept or reject.
Overall inpatient volumes are projected to increase slightly by about 5 percent because of increases in the region's population and rise in market share, due primarily to new contracts that were signed with heath plans, the new pediatric intensive care unit and a skilled nursing facility scheduled to open in January.
This creates an opportunity for these patients to receive their therapy needs in a skilled nursing facility.