Single

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Related to singleness: singleness of purpose

Single

In American taxation, the filing status for a legally unmarried person who does not qualify for any other filing status. In other words, single is the default filing status. This may affects one's tax liability; for example, single filers have lower income limits for most exemptions.

Single

The filing status used by an unmarried taxpayer who does not qualify for any other filing status.
References in periodicals archive ?
Laical singleness is largely the product of capitalism; in other words, the mass production of consumer goods and equitable distribution of these goods.
The legitimacy of the matchmaker, therefore, is accepted as legitimate by the "singles" who subject themselves to it, who turn to the matchmaker to overcome their deviant status of "protracted singleness.
The sound has a hollowness, a singleness he hasn't heard before.
The aforementioned well-known 16-word formula, which is said to have been passed down from the sage kings, reveals the early demand for a precise articulation of a priori centrality, especially in its last two sentences: "Have absolute refinement and singleness of mind.
Like the proud founder that he is, Schaeffer likened OPI's focus on nail lacquer to other companies' singleness of purpose.
He said the United States and other countries found at Thursday's sanctions committee meeting ''a unity of view, a singleness of purpose in implementing these resolutions.
Or is the more prosaic language of vocation a better way to talk about marriage and singleness both?
In her book The Single Woman: A Discursive Investigation, Reynolds uses unmarried women's own words to establish new frameworks for understanding singleness.
It's singleness relates to the singleness of Allah and it's the point in creation where everything else is manifested.
In 2008 I found myself officially single again after 28 years, but I decided to celebrate my singleness and appreciate all those positive aspects like being able to read/watch TV/paint my nails in bed without an argument, go to bed and wake when I wanted, cook what and when I liked, enjoy the fact that I could make my own decisions and I woke up to the reality that the world truly is my oyster.
Coming on the heels of John Najemy's widely acclaimed A History of Florence: 1200-1575 (2006), the volume is yet another sign of the singleness of purpose, deep familiarity with sources, historical personages, economic and political phenomena and events, breadth of vision, comprehensiveness, and commitment that presently characterize scholarship on Renaissance Florence and its sister states.
Another compelling sociological factor is the reality that, due to the dynamics of an industrialized economy, the length of singleness is increasing.