Sin Tax


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Idioms, Wikipedia.

Sin Tax

A tax on a good or service considered socially or ethically undesirable. For example, a government may levy a tax on the sale of alcohol. A sin tax finances programs to discourage the undesirable practice (in this example, it may fund anti-teen drinking programs). However, a sin tax may simply be a way for a government to generate revenue from something people are expected to do anyway.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
We are hoping that President Rodrigo Duterte will include in his first SONA how the government will improve utilizing the gains of the sin tax to achieve better health outcomes for every Filipino.
Rojas warned that failure to further increase the sin tax would result to 200,000 new smokers and 2,000 avoidable deaths from smoking-related diseases.
Previous information had indicated that beer would be excluded from any sin tax package, but there have been many contradictory reports in recent months.
Pinkney was instrumental in the passage of Cleveland's Issue 5, Extension of the Sin Tax.
We would also support review of the sin tax law for both alcohol and tobacco," Dominguez told reporters at the DOF headquarters.
Senator Risa Hontiveros backed Ejercito's proposal while Senator Grace Poe cited the position papers of Action for Economic Reforms and several other organization that 'failure to increase sin tax this year will result in additional 200,000 more new smokers.
Those who oppose this measure do not deserve a seat in the Senate in the coming years,' said Benjie Aquino, chair of the UP Diliman student council and member of the Youth for Sin Tax Movement, in a press briefing.
This was raised during a workshop on the Sin Tax where Jo-Ann Diosana, senior economist of Action for Economic Reforms (AER), noted the possibility of a reversal when the law will be reviewed in 2016.
Before the passage of the Sin Tax Law, there was an estimated 17 million active smokers in the country.
630 billion in taxes have been generated by the government from the sin tax law from January 2013 up to the first half of 2015.
The World Bank has cited the Philippines' sin tax reform as among the 'most successful' tobacco taxation that not only shored up revenues but also lessened smoking prevalence in the country.
The DOF and DOH were cited for their instrumental role in the passage of the 2012 Sin Tax Law, which according to Bloomberg Philanthropies "greatly simplified the tax system, introduced higher excise rates, and indexed the tax rate to an inflation proxy of 4 percent annually after 2017.