ratio

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Ratio

The division of one piece of financial information by another. Financial ratios are very common in fundamental analysis, which investigates the financial health of companies. An example of a financial ratio is the price-earnings ratio, which divides a publicly-traded company's share price by its earnings per share. This and other ratios help analysts determine whether a company's share price properly reflects its performance.

ratio

The relation between two quantities when compared mathematically with one another. For example, the most frequently used ratio among investors is the price-earnings ratio. Financial analysts, investors, and managers use ratios to evaluate many factors such as the attractiveness of a stock or the operating efficiency of a company. Also called financial ratio. See also activity ratio, debt management ratio, liquidity ratio, profitability ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
The signal dynamic range, for a minimum signal-to-noise ratio of 100, will be from about 68 [micro]V to 5 V (at the preamplifier output), which corresponds to a radiant power range of 34 nW to 2.
The perfect crystals provide high angular resolution while the multiple reflections suppress the "wings" of the beam profile, improving the signal-to-noise ratio to values comparable to that obtained with pinhole instruments.
Combining Bluetooth and proprietary noise compensation technologies, sound processing algorithms, techniques that improve signal-to-noise ratio and other audio science to deliver state-of-the-art personal sound - Sound ID has created a new category of Bluetooth-enabled hearing devices that change the way consumers experience sound.
The SSM2301 and SSM2304 have less than 1 percent total harmonic distortion plus noise (THD+N) when driving peak output loads from a 5 V supply, and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that is better than 98 dB.
Imaging and spectroscopy applications on mouse brain have demonstrated improvements in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of about 100%, or a factor of 2.