Side effects

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Side effects

Effects of a proposed project on other parts of the firm.

Side Effects

The effect a company's activity has on other activities in the company. For example, if an investment performs poorly, it may have the side effect of depriving other departments of funds needed for their own operations.
References in periodicals archive ?
They were asked about their expectation for who should monitor ADT side effects (participants were given the choice of "specialist, PCP, both, or other.
Occasionally, side effects can appear after a person has stopped taking the medicine, while some side effects might not be discovered until many people have been taking the medicine for a long time.
In addition, the experience of side effects was not significantly related to expectations of side effects, participants' level of general worry, or their level of general concern about birth control side effects.
Experiencing side effects is another major reason consumers give for noncompliance (Streicker et al.
The adverse side effects of steroid use also produce give-aways.
Recalling a drug that has substantial side effects spares some people from injury, but it may deprive others of a powerful tool that would probably have done them more good than harm.
My dermatologist didn't tell me any of the side effects,'' Noddle said.
Sambaru Prasad, CEO, Lipicard Technologies said, PLATROL(R) is the first anti-platelet drug, which promises no gastric irritation or related side effects.
To clear some of the haze surrounding side effects, scientists from Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital Boston created a network linking 809 medications to 852 side effects known as of 2005.
He and his colleagues assessed side effects in 596 cancer survivors who were treated with chemotherapy and/or radiation for various malignancies (hematologic, head and neck, lung, alimentary, genitourinary, gynecologic, and breast).
These findings underscore the need for physicians to assess cancer-related side effects .
Researchers found that combining these new drugs with older ones in a drug cocktail improved people's health, decreased side effects, lessened the likelihood of drug resistance, and brought HIV viral loads down to undetectable levels.