Shrinkage

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Shrinkage

Discrepancy between a firm's actual inventory and its recorded inventory due to theft, deterioration, loss, or clerical problems.

Shrinkage

A reduction in inventory due to a loss, theft, deterioration, or accounting error. Deterioration is a normal part of trading perishable goods. For example, a grocery store selling milk will likely experience shrinkage due to some of the milk spoiling. Shrinkage can be a tax write-off for the company experiencing it.

shrinkage

The loss of inventory encountered in the regular course of business. A firm engaged in transporting grain can expect to lose part of its product to weather, careless handling, and various other factors.
References in periodicals archive ?
The reduction of moisture content for the mass shrinkage determination was monitored using a scale with 0.
From investigations on steel castings [5, 6, 7, 8, 16] that measured the stiffness of the specimens with shrinkages by an extensometer during stress-controlled fatigue tests [5, 6, 7, 8] or tensile tests [16], it is known that the material's stiffness is influenced by the shrinkages present.
From the measured dimensions of the specimens and the nominal dimensions of the cavity--measured at room temperature--the linear shrinkages were determined according to (1):
The device was successfully used to measure wood shrinkage stresses along the radial direction under high-temperature drying (Cheng et al.
Exceeding the precompression or the maximum drying intensity (= most negative previous pore water pressure) resulted in an intense shrinkage and soil volume decrease.
Flow shrinkage was compared with transverse-to-flow shrinkage, and, similarly, near-gate shrinkage was compared with away-from-gate shrinkage, using the plaque mold.
Both companies estimated shrinkage using similar methodologies, generally multiplying a shrinkage rate based on experience by the amount of sales for the period between the physical inventory and year-end.
The third geometry, a channel with a rib on the back edge, and the fourth, a channel with a third wall, both show the effects of structural support on warpage and illustrate the trade-off between stiffness and shrinkage.
Meaningful comparisons should therefore be made on the basis of either constant shrinkage or LASE.
8-13 are, respectively, the spatial distribution of the transition time, residual stress profiles in the thickness direction just before ejection and at equilibrium, final shrinkages, strains built-up history during the molding cycle, and deformations.
In all cases, researchers show that a) thermal expansion in the radial and tangential axes is greater than that in the longitudinal axis; and b) moisture-induced shrinkage and swelling is far more significant than thermal expansion.