Tooth

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Tooth

Describing paper with rough texture, which makes the paper able to receive ink more easily.
References in periodicals archive ?
The times being what they are, and especially what they were when the show started to hit, it was a ripe period for satire and still is, and that was largely lucky.
Bruckner, meanwhile, is bringing its third-generation LISIM system to the show.
trade show for The Economist magazine that attracted schools from the U.
In the last year alone, the ratings for the entire three-hour block jumped by over 60 percent, from around 180,000 viewers to 431,000 viewers (as of April); a few shows in the block, like "Family Guy" (about a dysfunctional Rhode Island family), regularly draw more than a million viewers.
Effect of Processing Variables on Tensile Properties--An increase in the pouring temperature shows some improvement in the elongation of 12-mm sections, but the elongation in 3-mm sections and strength in both sections does not show any effect.
We do our best to make this a positive, comfortable experience for our speakers," says Burros, who notes that bright lights and cameras can be intimidating at first--something to which yours truly can attest after appearing on the show to talk about the widely known Eden Alternative for "bringing life to nursing homes.
The network argued the cancellation had nothing to do with the new rules, but affiliates would have received no credit for running the show.
I've got building codes and a lot of requirements before I can hold a show," she says, citing ceiling heights, freight elevators and load capacity as part of her checklist.
This is not to say that officers should screen out callers who question or even oppose specific departmental practices, but a live call-in show should not become a forum for malcontented citizens to bash the police department.
Mata and Hari, alumni of the Trudi Schoop company of the 1930s, made frequent appearances on Your Show of Shows because their mime suited its satiric style.
The show was a critical success, but an embarrassing bust in the ratings.
Of "Monte Verita," a show mapping the visionary utopias of the early twentieth century, Mario Merz said Szeemann "visualized the chaos we, as artists, have in our heads.