Waiting for the Other Shoe to Drop

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Waiting for the Other Shoe to Drop

The act or process of waiting for an impending decision or announcement. For example, an investor may wait for the other shoe to drop if he waits for an earnings announcement before deciding to buy.
References in classic literature ?
I'm sure we work hard enough to earn it," cried Jo, examining the heels of her shoes in a gentlemanly manner.
A dollar or two should be added to the price usually paid for Janie's shoes, which would insure their lasting an appreciable time longer than they usually did.
Uncas, look for the marks of a shoe that is long enough to uphold six feet two of tottering human flesh.
I had banished my shoes after the mouse, but my slippers would do for a summer night.
He showed no surprise at seeing another figure, but the unsteady fingers of one of his hands strayed to his lips as he looked at it (his lips and his nails were of the same pale lead- colour), and then the hand dropped to his work, and he once more bent over the shoe.
And then we must go to the left again, and then straight for'ard for a bit, up Shoe Lane: and then we shall be at the entry next to the o'erhanging window, where there's the nick in the road for the water to run.
He lost one of his shoes among the cabbages, and the other shoe amongst the potatoes.
The uses of every possession are two, both dependent upon the thing itself, but not in the same manner, the one supposing an inseparable connection with it, the other not; as a shoe, for instance, which may be either worn, or exchanged for something else, both these are the uses of the shoe; for he who exchanges a shoe with some man who wants one, for money or provisions, uses the shoe as a shoe, but not according to the original intention, for shoes were not at first made to be exchanged.
La Chantefleurie flung herself upon the little shoe, all that remained to her of all that she loved.
And sometime under the liquor drug, snatches of wisdom came to him far more lucidity than in his sober moments, as, for instance, one night, when he sat on the edge of the bed with one shoe in his hand and meditated on Dede's aphorism to the effect that he could not sleep in more than one bed at a time.
Daughtry found that he already understood and obeyed simple things such as "no," "yes," "get up," and "lie down," and he improved on them, teaching him, "Go into the bunk and lie down," "Go under the bunk," "Bring one shoe," "Bring two shoes.
SOME Workingmen employed in a shoe factory went on a strike, saying: "Why should we continue to work to feed and clothe our employer when we have none too much to eat and wear ourselves?