antitakeover measure

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Antitakeover Measure

Periodic or continual measures a firm's management takes to discourage unwanted or hostile takeovers. One example of an antitakeover measure is the macaroni defense, in which the company issues a large number of bonds with the proviso that they must be redeemed at a high price if the company is taken over. See also: Shark Watcher.

antitakeover measure

An action by a firm's management to block or halt a takeover by another party. Examples of antitakeover measures include a fairprice amendment, staggered terms of office for directors, and a requirement for an increased number of affirmative votes from shareholders to approve a takeover. See also show stopper.
References in periodicals archive ?
Baldridge (1969) had demonstrated the impracticability of deterring shark attacks by waterborne chemicals, so the idea of shark repellents had lost some of its appeal.
ONR's interest in sharks was not limited to their sensory abilities and shark repellents.
Because the shark hazard was perceived as more of a morale or perception problem than a real problem, the Navy tried other solutions while the shark repellent was being developed.
We'll be undertaking autopsies, testing out various shark repellents, discovering if sharks really do mistake surfers for seals, and we'll be doing all of this surrounded by the best experts in world.
Between the pill and other shark repellents (defence strategies) that have been developed, there is no need to do a Pac-Man.
If the company enters into a "strategic alliance" or other transaction, it could implement bust-up fees, management contracts and significant shark repellents that could make it impossible for a new Board to strike a better deal for the stockholders.
In his March 9 column, Newsweek's Allan Sloan called Marriott's bundling "unfair" and said the company "wants shareholders to approve the greatest array of shark repellents - Wall Street slang for anti-takeover defenses - this side of the Great Barrier Reef.
Sharply criticizing Wallace's corporate governance arrangements, TPM's report says that in addition to a poison pill, "The Wallace charter fairly bristles with shark repellents -- provision for a classified board, supermajority rules, bars to stockholder action via written consent, et al.