severalty


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Related to severalty: concurrent ownership

severalty

Sole ownership of real property.
References in periodicals archive ?
Land in severalty is a term that allows members of treaty groups to take their land allotment as described in the treaty off the reserve.
While the Dawes Act represented the final, full-scale realization of the allotment policy, many treaties made with western tribes from 1865 to 1868 provided for allotment in severalty of tribal lands.
First, as with the Brown example, resident heirs may bring suit to quiet title intending to acquire ownership in severalty of part of the farm.
33) To resolve any ambiguities, Lane proposed an amendment that would have specifically conferred citizenship on "Indians holding lands in severalty by allotment.
So we had in Australia three types of property regime in land and sea territory: first, private property in land, that is, land held in severalty, sole and individual ownership, legally termed fee land and alienable; second, the territorial sea and a great deal of land conceived as unownable, held in trust by the state for all citizens and having the status of public rights; and third, common property rights (and associated responsibilities) in land and sea held by geographically based, indigenous groups with defined and restricted memberships in customary or native title.
Especially in the final decades of the nineteenth century, attempts were made to foster the assimilation of Indigenous peoples by enacting legislation to that effect, such as the Canadian Indian Act (1876) and in the United States, the Seven Major Crimes Act (1885) and the Dawes Severalty Act (1887).
Some opted for citizenship and remained in Kansas; others, some 770 severalty Shawnees, moved south to Indian Territory.
The Dawes Act was first promulgated by Congress in 1887 and provided for the partition of reservations into smaller parcels to be held in severalty by individual Indians or Indian families.