severally

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Related to several: Joint and several

severally

This is one of those words that means the exact opposite of what you might guess. It means individually,although you might think it has something to do with several people.It is most often encountered in two situations. Property may be owned severally, or ?in severalty? meaning that there is one owner with no co-owners. In addition, one might see legal liability expressed as ?jointly and severally,? such as roommates who sign a lease together. They are both liable for the entire rent (jointly), and they are each individually liable for the entire rent (severally). If there is a default, the landlord may sue both of them and collect from whoever has money, or the landlord may choose to sue only one tenant and collect the entire amount from that one tenant, not simply
one-half of the debt.

References in classic literature ?
This prince has several machines fixed on wheels, for the carriage of trees and other great weights.
Five white men and one halfbreed were killed, and several wounded.
The rash attempt nearly decided my fate; for, fearful that I might slip from them, several of the islanders now raised a simultaneous shout, and pressing upon Karakoee, they menaced him with furious gestures, and actually forced him into the sea.
The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and Immunities of Citizens in the several States.
In the meantime, several minutes previously, Bérangère had coaxed the goat into a corner of the room with a marchpane cake, without any one having noticed her.
Soon the battle turned to a wild rout, and then to a grim massacre; for the French sailors had seen bits of D'Arnot's uniform upon several of the black warriors who opposed them.
We were both very tired, and the sight of these caverns, several of which could be easily barricaded, decided us to halt until the following morning.
This lasted several minutes, and White Fang was beginning to enjoy it, as a sort of game.
Several reasons make me believe in this; but the chief one is the remarkable effect which confinement or cultivation has on the functions of the reproductive system; this system appearing to be far more susceptible than any other part of the organisation, to the action of any change in the conditions of life.
The supper, although several strangers were present, consisted of two huge piles, one of roast beef, the other of boiled, with some pieces of pumpkin: besides this latter there was no other vegetable, and not even a morsel of bread.
Nor can the judicious reader be at a greater loss on account of Mrs Bridget Blifil, who, he may be assured, conducted herself through the whole season in which grief is to make its appearance on the outside of the body, with the strictest regard to all the rules of custom and decency, suiting the alterations of her countenance to the several alterations of her habit: for as this changed from weeds to black, from black to grey, from grey to white, so did her countenance change from dismal to sorrowful, from sorrowful to sad, and from sad to serious, till the day came in which she was allowed to return to her former serenity.
When a mental occurrence can be regarded as an appearance of an object external to the brain, however irregular, or even as a confused appearance of several such objects, then we may regard it as having for its stimulus the object or objects in question, or their appearances at the sense-organ concerned.