Fuzzy Logic

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Fuzzy Logic

A system which mathematically models complex relationships which are usually handled in a vague manner by language. Under the title of "Fuzzy Logic" falls formal fuzzy logic (a multi-valued form of logic), and fuzzy sets. Fuzzy sets measure the similarity between an object and a group of objects. A member of a fuzzy set can belong to both the set, and its complement. Fuzzy sets can more closely approximate human reasoning than traditional "crisp" sets. See: Crisp sets.

Fuzzy Logic

A form of logic programmed into some computers to allow them to use probability. That is, fuzzy logic allows computers to deal with uncertainty and to make decisions based on the information available. Unlike pure logic, which requires certainty, fuzzy logic helps computers make decisions the way humans do, only faster. This can be important in some investment strategies, such as arbitrage, that require decisions to be made very quickly.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on fuzzy logic, the fuzzy set theory was developed in 1965 by Zadeh at the University of Berkeley, California.
The reasons to use Cermelo--Fraenkel CF (C) set theory for logical reconstruction of physical theories can be the following: already in the first version of the year 1908 the German word "Urelement" was used.
The Russians who developed descriptive set theory and assigned names to subsets of the continuum posed the possibilities of the existence of new entities in the mathematical universe, and they went on to provide a program for future research which resulted in substantial agreement of mathematicians all over the world about the new entities.
ZFK formulated here has been constructed, like ZFC, to axiomatize the "naive" set theory of G.
223-232)--in which I compare a version of the Laws of Thought of Aristotle, stated in our set theory language, with the non-Aristotelian postulates of Korzybski, stated in my non-standard notation (discussed below).
This study focuses on the portfolio selection problem and the incorporation of fuzzy set theory with expert-knowledge in traditional approaches for optimizing the diversification benefit under risk tolerance.
In this manner it replaces the binary (Aristotelian) logic framework of set theory and incorporates "fuzziness" by appealing to multivalued logic.
Cohen was able to show that a consistent set theory may include or exclude the axiom of choice.
In 1938, logician Kurt Godel proved that the continuum hypothesis is consistent with the standard axioms of set theory.
And so are the fading memories of those one-time students who were made to trade their Slinkys for slide rules and who were taught, briefly, citizenship in set theory.
In fact, most of mathematics has Set Theory as its theoretical underpinning.