sell


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Sell

To relinquish ownership of some asset in exchange for some monetary compensation. Selling may take any of several forms. In a cash sale, the seller receives cash or a cash equivalent immediately in exchange for the asset. In a credit sale, the seller surrenders ownership immediately in exchange for future payment, often with interest. An example of a sale is a simple transaction involving widgets. If the seller is willing to accept $2 per widget and the buyer wishes to purchase 100 widgets, then the seller gives to the buyer 100 widgets and in their place receives $200. See also: Buy.

sell

To dispose of an asset. Compare buy.

sell

see SELLING.
References in periodicals archive ?
Purchase new property, with the intent to later sell, in a separate single-asset tax entity;
Establishing a sell strategy at the same time you buy a stock will help safeguard against making impulsive selling decisions.
Scalia, joined by Justices Clarence Thomas and Sandra Day O'Connor, fretted that defendants will see Sell as an open invitation to misuse the system and delay trial.
Europaische, the third-largest travel insurer in Germany, is planning to introduce vending machines that sell travel insurance at airports.
Day order: An order to buy or sell securities without a time notation.
a properly structured sale and leaseback may allow taxpayers to sell a personal residence, exclude any gain and continue to enjoy their home.
At Samson's upscale client, the fight has led to court where the cooperative shareholders are trying to compel the sponsor to sell.
If you invest say, $10,000, and the investment climbs to $20,000, you might sell half your shares.
However, if they wait until legally separated or divorced to sell, each can take the full exclusion.
The most tax-efficient strategy, says Weiss, is to sell your losers and let your winners run.
Most items sell for far less, and the money the studios take in is minuscule compared with box-office receipts.
While the majority of stores selling motor fuels are "branded" outlets that sell a specific major oil company's brand of fuel, NACS estimates that less than 7 percent of all convenience stores selling motor fuels are owned and operated by one of the five major oil companies.