seisin


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Related to seisin: disseisin, feoffment, Livery of seisin

seisin

The possession of real property by one who claims to own a freehold interest, which is generally everything except a leasehold interest.

References in periodicals archive ?
Assuming a Florida court chooses to apply the date of purchase in valuing an owner's title insurance loss, some further observations would be warranted, beginning with the use of seisin law as a basis for precedent.
MILSOM, THE LEGAL FRAMEWORK OF ENGLISH FEUDALISM 39-40 (1976) (arguing that common law system of seisin is rooted in feudalism and not Roman law).
added that such an interest could be "legitimately extinguished" and that it "is not such as to be absolutely repugnant to seisin in fee on the part of the state.
And Forasmuch as many complain themselves of Officers, Cryers of Fee, and the Marshals of Justices in Eyre, taking Money wrongfully of such as recover Seisin of Land, or of them that obtain their Suits, and Fines levied, and of Jurors, Towns, Prisoners, and of others attached upon Pleas of the Crown, otherwise than they ought to do .
The opinion attacked the argument in favor of the tenancy at will--the harsh application of the numerus clausus--as being grounded in the "antiquated notion" that a life estate cannot be created without livery of seisin.
Ralph's service as Acting Law Librarian was paralleled by the service, at President Brewster's request, of Professor John Blum, Yale's eminent historian of 20th-century America, as Acting Librarian of Sterling, the University Library, during a gap in the seisin at Sterling.
The traditional categorization of possessory estates and future interests--that great structure of doctrinal nebulae: reversions, rights of entry, possibilities of reverter, vested remainders, contingent remainders, and executory interests--developed in an England of aristocratic family dynasties and primogeniture, when the maintenance of feudal dues and seisin were still important, when competition between the courts of Chancery and of Common Law was most severe, when modes of conveyancing were still primitive and formal, and before the community had developed generalized notions of freedom of contract and private volition.