segregation

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Segregation

The practice of broker-dealers keeping securities for which a client has paid in full separate from securities the client has purchased on margin as well as from securities used as collateral on a margin account. Rule 15c3-3 requires segregation of these securities.

segregation

The safekeeping of a customer's securities in a separate location when the securities have been paid for in full. Segregated securities may not be commingled with the securities of the broker-dealer and they may not be used by the broker-dealer to collateralize loans. See also Rule 15c3-3.
References in periodicals archive ?
If there was a 'long civil rights movement,'" Jason Morgan Ward contends, "there was also a long segregationist movement" (2).
activists and white segregationists on the explicitly cultural terrains
For example, the historian John Cell argues persuasively that the principal function of segregationist ideology in the South was to soften class conflicts among whites, thus subordinating internal conflicts to the unifying concept of race.
Golden, the gadfly author of the Carolina Israelite newspaper, which circulated weekly mostly among southern Jews, developed a series of "Golden Plans" to show the absurdity of segregationist positions.
By the 1980s, most former segregationists and southern conservatives became Republicans, and they spearheaded efforts to roll back civil rights legislation, dismantle welfare programs, abolish affirmative action, and promote "law and order" by expanding the prison-industrial complex.
After 16 years in the House, he succeeded arch segregationist John Stennis in the U.
The segregationists had continued to heighten tension prior to September 3, 1957; after their experience in Hoxie, however, they had avoided a direct clash with federal authority.
Why did segregationists settle for these policies rather than continue to vote Democratic?
In 1961, Jones was appointed to the City Human Rights Commission for his success in building a multi-racial congregation despite unwelcome attention from segregationists.
But no one said they were right, that America would be a better place today if the segregationists had won the political battles against integrationists like Martin Luther King Jr.
That Senate Democrats might actually apply standards of ethics and judicial temperament--Pickering consorted with segregationists and challenged the Voting Rights Act--drew cries of foul from Republicans.