Secular

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Secular

Long-term time frame (10-50 years or more).

Secular Market

A market as defined by its overarching, long-term trends. Generally, a secular market refers to trends over a period of five or more years. A secular market may be bullish or bearish, and, in market analysis, takes precedence over opposite, short-term trends that happen within the secular market. For example, the Great Depression in the United States lasted from 1929 until World War II (certainly a bearish secular market). Even though some years saw significant GDP growth (including 14.2% growth in 1936), this did not prevent the secular market from being bearish. Thus, a secular market describes general trends in the market without regard for anomalous trends in the interim. See also: Cyclical market.
References in periodicals archive ?
One cannot read The Problem with Multiculturalism and still accept the notion that secularity simply emerged in modernity as the luminous work of human reason, freed from the superstitions and absurdities of its religious past.
the nation-state), secularity itself can be taken as a given.
In this sense, one could speak of the globalization of a Taylorian political and legal secularity and sensibility.
These two modes of interrelating the mystical and the political--the love of God and engagement with and for our neighbour--are interpreted as the two fundamental forms of relationship to secularity, and the striving for holiness, in our own time.
But no--Cummings is generally emphatic that the new mortality should be read as qualifying Renaissance religious experience rather than as looking toward secularity.
Embodying the longing--and the partial failure-to glimpse that which lies beyond the self, Orientalism here serves a form of secularity that cultivates wonder.
Then, drawing on Asad and Foucault, he notes the limited perspective such secularity affords.
One wonders if the trend towards secularity will mean that such stories and myths die and that new generations will not be able to interpret or understand inferences in the same way that most people now cannot understand inferences to, say, Greek or Babylonian myths and stories--even if these continue to be present in our cultures to some extent.
Today, nonreligious students are increasingly seeing their personal secularity as a key aspect of their character and their approach to life, an identity that immediately conveys much about what they accept and reject.
In fact, for hundreds of millions of people, secularity, and with it skepticism and critical thinking, are at the core of their basic existence.
In order for us to evaluate Taylor's ideas about "religion," and the place of ritual and codes in religious life, he would have to engage work in theology and religious studies that have dealt with questions about secularity for a long time.
The Post Vatican II Church has often sought to clarify that the secularity and religious neutrality of the state does not mean moral neutrality.