Secular

(redirected from secularism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Secular

Long-term time frame (10-50 years or more).

Secular Market

A market as defined by its overarching, long-term trends. Generally, a secular market refers to trends over a period of five or more years. A secular market may be bullish or bearish, and, in market analysis, takes precedence over opposite, short-term trends that happen within the secular market. For example, the Great Depression in the United States lasted from 1929 until World War II (certainly a bearish secular market). Even though some years saw significant GDP growth (including 14.2% growth in 1936), this did not prevent the secular market from being bearish. Thus, a secular market describes general trends in the market without regard for anomalous trends in the interim. See also: Cyclical market.
References in periodicals archive ?
The hypothesis, therefore, was that Defense against Secularism should at least partially mediate negative relationships of Religious Fundamentalism, Biblical Foundationalism, and Truth of Texts and Teachings with Intellect Oriented Reflection.
The Congress President recalled that Nehru had once warned that he would fight to his last breath of his life to protect secularism if it comes under attack.
One manifestation of secularism is asserting the right to be free from religious rule and teachings or, in a state declared to be neutral on matters of belief, from the imposition by government of religion or religious practices upon its people.
The claim that secularism is really just Christianity in disguise is manifestly false.
It turns out that tyranny and secularism can coexist.
Other sessions at the conference explored secularism in France, where the government is at odds over how to regulate Islamic dress in public spheres, and in Israel, a secular state where religious groups, particularly ultra-Orthodox Jews, wield heavy influence.
It remains of course an open question whether secularism can in fact provide what religion has provided in the past.
The issue here is whether Muslim-veil bans impinge on the rights of freedom of expression and religion, or whether states may legally justify a ban on the basis of secularism and women's rights.
Secularism and Freedom of Conscience makes for a timely read, not just for someone living in Ireland, but to a general audience because, to a lesser or greater degree, we are all facing the same challenge.
This secularism, unlike secularism in the West, did not banish religion from public life.
If I spoke like Tim Spall I would probably get more parts" Actor Richard E Grant, pictured "What we are facing is not so much secularism.
Would it have the courage to deny the funding and try to force secularism on them?