Secular

(redirected from secularisation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to secularisation: secularization

Secular

Long-term time frame (10-50 years or more).

Secular Market

A market as defined by its overarching, long-term trends. Generally, a secular market refers to trends over a period of five or more years. A secular market may be bullish or bearish, and, in market analysis, takes precedence over opposite, short-term trends that happen within the secular market. For example, the Great Depression in the United States lasted from 1929 until World War II (certainly a bearish secular market). Even though some years saw significant GDP growth (including 14.2% growth in 1936), this did not prevent the secular market from being bearish. Thus, a secular market describes general trends in the market without regard for anomalous trends in the interim. See also: Cyclical market.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pendant la premiere partie des annees 1990, la secularisation n'a qu'une position marginale par comparaison au << proselytisme des sectes >> et aux relations tendues/incertaines avec l'Eglise Roumaine Unie (Greco Catholique).
More than defending secular institutions, we need as well to be able to defend, at a global level, secularisation itself, showing that it is in fact secularisation with its emphasis on choice that has allowed religious freedom, maybe even the current resurgence of religion.
Pakistani academic and author of the forthcoming Secularising Islamists, Iqtidar, may view the process as perhaps contributing to the process of secularisation of the state and society.
In 1965 he published an essay entitled "Towards Eliminating the Concept of Secularisation.
The impact of post-Renaissance secularisation of the Western world has generally been benign.
Yet, despite decades of the systematic secularisation of every aspect of British society, when the news finally came, English newspapers appeared genuinely shocked.
In a wide-ranging interview with German television yesterday, the Pontiff spoke of Europe's role in Christianity, secularisation in the Western world as well as the growing importance of churches in Africa and Latin America.
Lawrence's religion; Wordsworth's influence; the roles of Maistre and Shelley; Carlyle's religion; the influen ce of female piety on art; 'women's theology and the periodical press in Britain; Florence Nightingale's 'feminist theology'; the influence of Elizabeth Gaskell, of science and secularisation, of Philip Gosse; and, finally, the 'war' between science and religion.
The results of that study are due to be released any day now, and it is widely expected that the report will recommend a total secularisation of the school system.
According to Hartoonian: 'Semper thus anticipates the predicament of logocentrism and opens a "spatiality" through which architecture could be loosed from the ground of historicism to become subject to the dynamics of secularisation.