Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate

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Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate

A rate used to reduce seasonal noise on a company's sales or revenue information. For example, many retail companies tend to have higher sales figures at the end of the calendar year because of the holiday season. Comparing the raw data may make the company's sales look better than they are. The SAAR is designed to even out that trend. It is calculated by taking the raw annual rate for a given month and dividing by a seasonality factor.
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In general, the choice of whether to use direct or indirect seasonal adjustment is related to the level of index aggregation.
Even after seasonal adjustment, the irregular components of a time series are often noisy and variable.
If the new pattern persists, the seasonal adjustment method will eventually reflect it; if the pattern keeps shifting, however, seasonally adjusted data will become chronically troublesome.
Moreover, we argue that failing to control for abnormal weather effects distorts conventional seasonal adjustment procedures.
The middle figure at right plots the quarterly seasonal adjustments to real GDI.
This would mean that the price of the property has to be finally adjusted (after adjusting for all other factors) by the difference in the seasonal adjustment factors between the two months.
After seasonal adjustment, the two sales peaks associated with the end-dates of the home-buyers' tax credits are clear," Pakko writes.
The unemployment figure in January according to TurkStat, prior to the seasonal adjustment, stood at 14.
This was due to a seasonal adjustment issue: securities firms hired fewer summer interns so when the expected loss in intern employment was not found in the raw September data, the seasonal adjustment processed it as a gain.
The seasonal adjustment comes by way of a complex and well-established algorithm that tweaks the actual number of jobs reported in the BLS survey upward or downward based on whether the month in question has traditionally seen more or fewer jobs than other months.
6 percent from November to December 2008 after seasonal adjustment, according to preliminary data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.