Hacker

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Hacker

A person who infiltrates a computer system, usually in order to gather information. A hacker finds a way past the system's protocols. Some hackers do this simply for the thrill, though many others hack for nefarious purposes. For example, a hacker may be hired by a company or government to conduct espionage on a competitor or enemy. Other hackers freelance in order to find things like credit card numbers to facilitate identity theft and other crimes. However, the word is not always used in a negative context.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scammers want to get to people who have executive authority.
Scamwatch says scammers often promise prizes, loans, jobs, discounted products and other financial rewards in exchange for sending money upfront through untraceable wire transfers.
There was the data breach at Equifax, for instance, following which scammers called people to "verify" their Equifax account information.
Romance scams in the US now bring in the highest amount of money to organised gangs of scammers than any other type of internet fraud, according to the FBI, and that may only be the tip of the iceberg as it is estimated that only around 15 per cent of victims report the cases to authorities.
The scammer continued to claim that he worked for the IRS at its office in Philadelphia, McKee said.
DOORSTEP SCAMS Scammers may knock on your door pretending to be traders, perhaps offering to do work on your home or garden.
In this case it would mean adjusting the pace of exchange to ensure scammers felt they were making progress, and then slowing down to frustrate them.
The scammers frequently use intimidation to get what they want, threatening to seize the victim's property or involve the police.
Summary: When you are skimming your Facebook newsfeed, it’s often a split-second decision to hit the “like” button – so it’s no surprise that scammers are .
The Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS), which revealed this data, also reckons that more than three-quarters of all scammers are either operating via cold-calls, or online methods.
The Financial Ombudsman Service reckons more than 75 per cent of scammers operate via cold calls or online.
The Internal Revenue Service warned taxpayers Thursday of telephone scammers targeting students and parents during the back-to-school season and demanding payments for nonexistent taxes, such as the "Federal Student Tax.