Salmonella

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Salmonella

A genus of bacteria known to cause illness in humans and animals, especially after they have eaten infected food. Salmonella infections have been associated with chicken eggs, a fact that in the past has caused marketing and other business problems in the poultry industry in the United States. However, fatal poisonings are extremely rare.
References in periodicals archive ?
Opinion of the Scientific Committee for Veterinary Measures Relating to Public Health on Salmonellae in Foodstuffs, Adopted 14-15 April 2003.
Those studies have consistently shown that dewatered biosolids applied to agricultural land may contain high concentrations of salmonellae and E.
SE Salmonella-positive SE as a proportion of Year isolates rinses all salmonellae (%)* 2000 23 914 2.
The work of these researchers clearly demonstrates the fallacies of early research endeavors: Swine fecal specimens routinely contain salmonellae, and it is obvious that Smith and Salmon associated their isolation of these organisms with the cause of early poorly defined and challenging diseases like hog cholera.
Moreover, since Salmonellae entering the body via the digestive tract can survive until ingested by macrophages, such a vaccine would be effective when taken orally.
This dual chromogen medium enables the isolation of Salmonellae (including Salmonella typhi and S.
Typhimurium and demonstrates that companion animal facilities may serve as foci of transmission for salmonellae between animals and humans if adequate precautions are not followed.
Antimicrobial resistance is common among salmonellae and has been increasing, particularly in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, the most common Salmonella serotype (2,3).
Foodborne salmonellae are estimated to cause [approximately equal to] 1.
Both strains were the same phage type, were indistinguishable by plasmid profile typing, and were different from 97% of salmonellae (8) in that they did not decarboxylate lysine.
This case shows not only the emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in typhoid salmonellae but also the inadequacy of the current laboratory guidelines for detection of this resistance.
To the Editor: Nontyphoidal salmonellae are the important causative agents of foodborne diseases in Japan and other industrialized countries.