Rock the Boat

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Rock the Boat

Informal; to change the way things are done, especially in a sudden or abrupt way. For example, a new manager may rock the boat by dramatically changing a company's production process. Rocking the boat is sometimes successful, though it is often difficult.
References in classic literature ?
Heyward yielded the guidance of the canoe implicitly to the scout, who approached or receded from the shore, to avoid the fragments of rocks, or deeper parts of the river, with a readiness that showed his knowledge of the route they held.
Still it seemed a long way up in the air, in that waste and lonely wilderness of rocks.
watching the ghost-wolves leap and leap to drag me down, till the rock grew smooth beneath the wearing of their feet.
Then he and Jip got out of the ship on to the rock.
All that Edmond had been able to do was to drag himself about a dozen paces forward to lean against a moss-grown rock.
As for you, coxswain, these are your orders; attend to them, for the ship is in your hands; turn her head away from these steaming rapids and hug the rock, or she will give you the slip and be over yonder before you know where you are, and you will be the death of us.
Athos turned around with an effort; the sight of the young man was evidently painful to him, and there he still was, in fact, on the rock, the beacon shedding around him, as it were, a doubtful aureole.
They had to lower themselves cautiously and slowly, from steep to steep; and, while they managed with difficulty to maintain their own footing, to aid their horses by holding on firmly to the rope halters, as the poor animals stumbled among slippery rocks, or slid down icy declivities.
There would he be seen, at all times and in all weathers, sometimes in his skiff, anchored among the eddies, or prowling like a shark about some wreck, where the fish are supposed to be most abundant; sometimes seated on a rock from hour to hour, looking, in the mist and drizzle, like a solitary heron watching for its prey.
On his return, he reported that the shelves of rock on our right would enable us to gain with little risk the bottom of the cataract.
They recoiled from the heat, and stood on a point of the rock, gazing in a stupor at the flames which were spreading rap idly down the mountain, whose side, too, became a sheet of living fire.
From the number of dead bodies in canoes observed upon this rock by the first explorers of the river, it received the name of Mount Coffin, which it continues to bear.