right-of-way


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right-of-way

(1) The right to use another's land for ingress or egress,which is a type of easement. (2) Either deeded rights or easement rights in the government for public roads, streets, and highways. Government rights-of-way may extend for many feet outside the paved boundary or even beyond the shoulder of the road. Typical rights-of-way are measured from 30 to 50 feet from the centerline of the road and may be larger if the government secured enough land for future road widening. (Before building, excavating, or even planting trees along the side of a road, one should check with the local road department for right-of-way measurements.)

References in periodicals archive ?
Least chipmunks preferred the right-of-way ([chi square] = 11.
An adult male southern red-backed vole crossed the right-of-way at powerline site 2 during its natural movements (two crosses by one individual).
During their natural movements, North American deermice readily crossed the right-of-way (13 crosses by nine individuals) and the right-of-way at control sites (four crosses by four individuals).
Least chipmunks crossed the right-of-way in their natural movements (four crosses by three individuals) and after translocation at powerline sites.
Southern red-backed voles in edge and forested habitats at powerline sites exhibited significant directional movements parallel to the right-of-way (Rayleigh's test, P < 0.
Our results differ from Goldingay and Whelan (1997), who reported that abundance decreased along a powerline right-of-way in eucalyptus forests.
The open, early-successional habitats created by the powerline right-of-way likely favors increased abundance of least chipmunks and North American deermice.
Although rate of capture may have increased in forested habitat due to greater distance from the right-of-way, the higher rate of capture in forested habitat at control sites suggests that availability of water also was a factor.
Although presence of riparian habitats may have influenced our results, we suggest that the right-of-way also had an effect on distribution and density of southern red-backed voles.
We do not believe our data support avoidance of the right-of-way by cinereus shrews.
Least chipmunks were significantly more abundant within the right-of-way at powerline sites.
The influence a right-of-way has on movements often depends on successional stage of the right-of-way, with early succession being a barrier to forest-dwelling species (Gates, 1991).