right-of-way


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right-of-way

(1) The right to use another's land for ingress or egress,which is a type of easement. (2) Either deeded rights or easement rights in the government for public roads, streets, and highways. Government rights-of-way may extend for many feet outside the paved boundary or even beyond the shoulder of the road. Typical rights-of-way are measured from 30 to 50 feet from the centerline of the road and may be larger if the government secured enough land for future road widening. (Before building, excavating, or even planting trees along the side of a road, one should check with the local road department for right-of-way measurements.)

References in periodicals archive ?
Movements between captures were standardized such that 0[degrees] represented movement directly toward the right-of-way and 180[degrees] was directly away from the right-of-way.
Least chipmunks preferred the right-of-way ([chi square] = 11.
An adult male southern red-backed vole crossed the right-of-way at powerline site 2 during its natural movements (two crosses by one individual).
During their natural movements, North American deermice readily crossed the right-of-way (13 crosses by nine individuals) and the right-of-way at control sites (four crosses by four individuals).
Least chipmunks crossed the right-of-way in their natural movements (four crosses by three individuals) and after translocation at powerline sites.
Southern red-backed voles in edge and forested habitats at powerline sites exhibited significant directional movements parallel to the right-of-way (Rayleigh's test, P < 0.
Our results differ from Goldingay and Whelan (1997), who reported that abundance decreased along a powerline right-of-way in eucalyptus forests.
It - Invitation To Bid (Itb): Mowing And Trimming Of Road Right-Of-Ways
WCG can be quite competitive in terms of cost and timing given its use of pipeline right-of-ways inherited from TWC.
Because of the superior detail and accuracy of the imagery from DAIS-1, it is an excellent tool for both small-area and linear feature activities, such as assessing utility right-of-ways, conducting wetlands studies and performing detailed landcover analysis.