Rider

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Rider

A form accompanying an insurance policy that alters the policy's terms or coverage.

Rider

An amendment to a document, especially an insurance policy. More formally, it is called an endorsement. The insurance company may issue the rider to change the terms of coverage, or the policyholder may do so, especially to add a family member to the policy. Generally, riders increase coverage in exchange for higher premiums.

Rider.

A rider is a modification to an insurance policy that typically adds a new coverage or higher coverage in return for higher premiums.

For example, you might add a rider to your life insurance policy to provide coverage for your spouse, or a rider to your homeowners policy to provide additional liability insurance for a specific event. Dental care and prescription insurance are typical riders on health insurance policies.

rider

(1) An amendment or attachment to a contract. (2) Commonly used to indicate additional terms or coverages for standard insurance contracts.

References in classic literature ?
For a man who has never even hunted and knows nothing whatever about the country," Somerfield declared, "to attempt to ride in a steeplechase of this sort is sheer folly.
Do you know, Grace, I believe, I really believe he'll ride her
He perhaps cannot ride about on a trained pony with a long stick and knock a small ball between two posts, but I think that if he had to ride for his own life or the life of others he would show you all something.
My dear young lady," he said, "it was a great pleasure and a very pleasant ride.
I could never learn, for he was carried within the barrier, and as I had chanced to break the bone of my leg it was a great unease for me to ride or even to stand.
I ride in his service," cried the other, "and I carry that which belongs to him.
Yet I have known the king's enemies claim to ride in his same," said Sir Nigel.
I pray you, Edricson, to ride up to them and to ask them the cause of it.
When they parted at night Edmund asked Fanny whether she meant to ride the next day.
I shall not ride to-morrow, certainly," said Fanny; "I have been out very often lately, and would rather stay at home.
Edmund looked pleased, which must be Fanny's comfort, and the ride to Mansfield Common took place the next morning: the party included all the young people but herself, and was much enjoyed at the time, and doubly enjoyed again in the evening discussion.
She has not been out on horseback now this long while, and I am persuaded that, when she does not ride, she ought to walk.