Vision

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Vision

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The new Retina displays feature a wider color gamut that brings more brilliant and true-to-life colors to your desktop.
In humans and many other animals, the retina sits at the back of the eye, instead of at the front, where cones and rods could absorb the most light.
com/after-texting-girlfriend-too-much-dark-chinese-man-suffers-detached-retina-285640) Medical Daily reports that retina detachment is more common in older people, but with the increasing use of cellphones among the younger population, has been occurring more frequently with the youth.
Beginning June 2, customers can pre-register for iPad Air and iPad mini with Retina display at DOCOMO dealers and DOCOMO's website.
That's the same as the resolution of the full-size iPad with Retina display, which, at 9.
To see if these upgrades are worth the significant cost, we put the ultimate 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro through the paces of our newSpeedmark 8system performance benchmark suite.
8220;With Retina CS, BeyondTrust provides the requisite security functionality to ensure that customers can safely embrace new technologies and business practices that will be essential to remain competitive in the future,” said Frost & Sullivan Industry Analyst Chris Rodriguez.
The retina is a thin, delicate piece of tissue in the back of the eye that is comprised of a variety of different neuronal cells, including 125 million photoreceptors (rods and cones) that process light and enable you to see.
The center of the retina, known as the macula, is responsible for fine central vision in visually intensive tasks such as reading and driving.
That information is passed to still another group of cells, called the ganglia, which are also in the retina.
People who are short-sighted are also more prone to it - their eyes are larger and so the retina could be stretched and under stress.
Lawrence Chong of the Doheny Eye Institute clinics in Los Angeles and Pasadena, the retina specialist who treated Clanton.