retail gravitation

retail gravitation

The ability of a shopping center to draw business away from other shopping areas. See also Reilly's law of retail gravitation.

References in periodicals archive ?
1) Reilly published The Law of Retail Gravitation in 1931 after he realized that Newtons Law of Gravitation seemed to loosely express the empirical regularities he observed while conducting several trading area investigations for chain grocery stores in Texas during the late 1920s (Reilly, 1929).
If one adopted this hypothesis, then the law of retail gravitation could be used to calculate the breaking point" between two places, where customers will be drawn to one or another of two competing commercial centers (Anas, 1987, pp.
60) findings reinforced previous studies and again found that Reilly's law of retail gravitation provides a remarkably accurate delineation of the Charlotte retail trading area.
Scholars, retail executives, real estate investors, and urban planners enthusiastically embraced Reilly's Law of Retail Gravitation as an iron law of retail trade distribution, but at the same time a number of methodological amplifications were introduced in the 1960s and 1970s which culminated in the introduction of the "Huff model" (Applebaum, 1965, p.
The Huff model, which was first articulated in two articles published I in 1963 and 1964, incorporated these four modifications to Reilly's Law to construct an alternative model of retail gravitation based on consumer behavior theory and goods theory, rather than central place theory.
36) noted that his model "resembles the original model formulated by Reilly" but he argued that it differed from Reilly's Law of Retail Gravitation "in several important respects.
One of the first and most famous of the models is the Reilly's Law of Retail Gravitation.
Reilly's (1931) Law of Retail Gravitation Models suggests that area choice is a complex trade-off between the general attractions and the general disincentives of shopping at that area.
Reilly, W J, The Law of Retail Gravitation, Knickerbocker Press, New York, (1931).

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