restraining order


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restraining order

See temporary restraining order.
References in periodicals archive ?
The court heard he was jailed in November 2014 for two years for inflicting grievous bodily harm and breaching the restraining order.
Judge Tony Briggs told Cooper: "You have an unfortunate history of breaching restraining orders.
However, less than a week later, their relationship apparently got seriously tested after she learned that he received two restraining orders from his exes.
Personal violence restraining orders seek to secure the safety and protection of a victim who fears that a defendant has or is likely to commit a personal violence offence that causes harm to the victim.
A SON who made his mum's life so miserable she took out restraining orders against him is now behind bars.
Davies will also have to pay a PS80 victim surcharge and was made the subject of a five-year restraining order.
He received six months for the assault and the first breach of the restraining order, and a three-month sentence for the second breach.
Virzi dismissed charges against David Stanley related to violation of a restraining order, resisting arrest and disturbing the peace during the Oct.
However, that was before news of the restraining order broke and Henry made no comment when he left the meeting at 1am, with Liverpool having released a statement almost two hours earlier on the club website.
However, Ronson has denied seeking any restraining order against her.
The restraining order, as people are fond of saying, is "just a piece of paper.
Supreme Court, in a 7-2 opinion, ruled that the failure of the police to adequately enforce a restraining order does not constitute a constitutional violation and therefore individuals can not pursue a federal claim for harm resulting from this failure.