Republican

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Republican

A person who believes or participates in a polity governed by elected officials. In a republic, the citizens elect representatives who vote on issues of governance. Often, republics are called democracies, in which citizens themselves vote on issues of governance, but the two terms are not identical.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patriotic Catechism provides a way to examine how religion themes become cultural practices, circulating almost unnoticed within different ideological or partisan points of view related to the Argentinean republicanism and the royalists.
a consensus that holds our republicanism to require basic political
Indeed, his discussion of Machiavelli's relationship to Roman republicanism in chapter 2 makes very important historiographical contributions in its own right.
Zinoman even implies, rightly, that anti-feminism was not antithetic to early-twentieth-century French republicanism.
Hence civic republicanism avoided the disruptive and centrifugal forces of the separatist republicanism associated with the American and French Revolution.
He replied: "I do not accept Irish republicanism is anywhere in Celtic history.
At the same time, another contribution suggests that English republicanism had little effect on Dutch thinkers because they felt at heart it was imbued with monarchism and because they believed that the execution of Charles I was wrong.
Again, the historiography of early twentieth-century Irish republicanism has been transformed in recent decades by a shelf of intimate studies of local dynamics and yet--as well as omitting such work by Hart and Augusteijn--Grant also refrains from mentioning work by Marie Coleman on the revolution in Longford or even David Fitzpatrick's classic study of Clare.
My suspicion is that while Ferguson appears to be an anomaly with regard to ways in which proponents of modern republican thought have understood debates in the eighteenth century, as debates over the appropriateness of democratic/aristocratic republicanism versus monarchy, Ferguson may not be so much of the anomaly as portrayed by McDaniel.
In general, Grant maps the terrain of socialist republicanism effectively and illuminates the links between left-republicans, communists and labour activists, suggesting that strategic differences provided the main impediments to unity and closer collaboration between the various strands of the movement.
Adrian Grant examines the rise of Irish socialist republicanism between 1909 and 1936.

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